News

Firm Open Sources Framework for AWS Infrastructure-as-Code

Seattle company Pulumi has open sourced a framework to smooth the process of enterprise application production and deployment on the Amazon Web Services Inc. (AWS) cloud platform.

Called Pulumi Crosswalk for Amazon Web Services (AWS), the framework provides infrastructure-as-code components, facilitating the use of best practices to help organizations get a handle on all of the services and products available on the cloud platform in order to define and deploy modern AWS applications and infrastructure.

"Crosswalk for AWS offers higher-level components for a wide range of the AWS platform -- from serverless (Lambda, API Gateway and more) to containers (ECS, Fargate) to Kubernetes (EKS) and across networking (VPCs, SecurityGroups), monitoring (Cloudwatch Dashboards and Alarms) and load balancing (ALB and NLB)," the company said in a June 10 blog post. "Because Crosswalk builds on the primitive building blocks of the AWS platform, you can use 100 percent of what AWS offers, and can seamlessly move between high-level components and low-level platform primitives, mixing-and-matching as needed."

Pulumi Crosswalk for Amazon Web Services (AWS)
[Click on image for larger view.] Pulumi Crosswalk for Amazon Web Services (AWS) (source: Pulumi)

An accompanying software development kit (SDK) provides tools and libraries used to define infrastructure as code using programming languages such as JavaScript, Python, TypeScript and Go.

Supported patterns include:

  • Container services
  • Serverless functions and APIs
  • Secure infrastructure
  • Authentication and authorization
  • Application and infrastructure monitoring
  • CI/CD integrations

"Enterprises are becoming powered by more and more cloud software and in that transformation they need tools to build, automate and operate that software," the company quoted Holger Mueller, vice president and principal analyst at Constellation Research, as saying in a news release. "To achieve the acceleration they need to remain relevant, enterprises need these tools to make their cloud engineers more productive and, as the reality shifts to multi-cloud, to enable them to manage software on any public cloud consistently and securely. This challenge, deploying software productively and safely, increasingly on multiple public clouds, and starting with AWS, is what Pulumi Crosswalk does well and we expect a good reception by CTOs building next-generation applications."

Pulumi also offers open source projects for working with other cloud platforms, such as Azure and Google Cloud Platform. The company's numerous open source projects -- including an Amazon Web Services (AWS) Pulumi resource package, Amazon Web Services (AWS) provider and Pulumi AWS Infrastructure Components -- can be found on GitHub.

About the Author

David Ramel is the editor of Visual Studio Magazine.

Featured