News

Cisco Claims New Storage Server Beats AWS on Cost

Cisco Systems Inc. claims its new UCS S-Series Storage Servers are 56 percent less expensive over a three-year period than the Amazon S3 storage service offered by the Amazon Web Services Inc. (AWS) cloud.

Cisco's Bill Shields made that claim in a blog post in which investigated an AWS cost comparison as part of a discussion about public cloud versus on-premises implementations.

"I was asked the question of how a S3260 managed by a customer in their own data center or colo would compare to Amazon S3 storage," Shields explained in last week's post. "I was completely blown away with what I found.

"The short story is the on-prem solution is 56 percent less expensive over three years with a 13 month breakeven point. If you don't like CapEx, using a Cisco Capital lease, your monthly payments can be less than your payments to Amazon. [I wonder if this is why companies like Dropbox, Moz, and HubSpot are moving away from public cloud?]"

For his research, Shields compared his company's offering with an AWS configuration featuring 420TB of S3 storage with an always-on 10Gbps connection, housed in the AWS US East N. Virginia region, using this AWS pricing. Shields also figured in network and support costs.

The AWS configuration was pitched against a UCS S3260 Storage Server, with tacked on expenses for a software license, warranty and other costs. In Shields' comparison, Amazon S3 costs totaled $551,373.48 over three years, while the Cisco server configuration came in at $243,432.

After explaining the details of his comparison, Shields concluded: "While we are all tempted by instant gratification, it's pretty clear that storing data in the cloud comes at a premium over the long haul. There can be very good reasons for data to live in the cloud. Just as there are very good reason why data should be on-prem. It will depend upon the cost, application, speed of access, privacy, security concerns, etc. The list is a long one and you will need to decide where the best place for your data is."

About the Author

David Ramel is the editor of Visual Studio Magazine.

Featured

Most   Popular