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Datos IO Becomes AWS Partner, Offers Cloud-Native Protection

Cloud-scale data protection company Datos IO yesterday announced it was now an Amazon Web Services Inc. (AWS) Standard Partner, offering cloud-native next-generation protection for applications and databases.

Specifically, "Datos IO will enable enterprises to protect their next-generation SaaS applications or applications (such as Internet of Things [IoT], Analytics, eCommerce and others) hosted on IaaS [Infrastructure-as-a-Service] and PaaS architectures natively deployed on AWS against data corruption, disasters and human errors," the company said in a statement yesterday.

That protection comes with the company's flagship RecoverX software, which it describes as "the industry's first and only NoSQL, scale-out distributed database recovery software."

"Enterprises can now deploy Datos IO RecoverX on AWS using Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) instances for compute as well as store backups natively in the cloud to Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3), or alternatively to on-premise file and object stores," the company said. "RecoverX allows enterprises to recover data natively in the cloud, recover data back from the cloud to on-premise secondary storage for data portability, and for multi-cloud from one cloud to another -- helping enterprises implement their multi-cloud strategies."

According to the RecoverX Web site, a key component of the solution is called Consistent Orchestrated Distributed Recovery (CODR), an architectural approach independent from reliance upon media servers, meaning that it can transfer in parallel data to and from both file-based and object-based secondary storage.

"Although the cloud provides security and data availability, data is still vulnerable to internal user error which can result in accidental deletion," said the company quoted 451 Research analyst Henry Baltazar as saying. "Datos IO's RecoverX software can be run on the AWS Cloud to protect application data and provide rapid recovery should data become corrupted or deleted."

About the Author

David Ramel is the editor of Visual Studio Magazine.

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